Browsing Tag

Wool care

How to Deal With Pilling and Bobbling on Wool

December 11, 2018 Tags: , , No Comments

If your wool clothes or home textiles have annoying bobbling or are looking older than they should, we’ve got some tips on how to prevent and get rid of pilling. Caused by broken fibres bunching together to form tiny balls, pills and bobbles often occur in areas of high friction, like the cuffs and armpits of sweaters. Pilling is more common in mixed fibre textiles, especially those that include polyester. Synthetic fibres are more prone to bobbling, so choose natural fabrics like linen or wool whenever possible.

Once a garment has bobbles the little balls will just keep on getting bigger, as other broken fibres from different items are attracted to them. This can result in pills that are different colours than the original garment, as bits of fluff and fuzz from other things become attached to the existing bobbles.

how to get rid of bobbles

 

Thankfully, pilling is pretty easy to deal with. Firstly, it’s important to try to avoid it in the first place. Here’s how to avoid pilling on wool garments:

  • Wash the item inside out on a gentle/ wool cycle, or hand wash if possible. The less friction it meets the less it will bobble.
  • Use a specialist detergent for wool or delicates.
  • Don’t overload your washing machine as this can damage the fibres, and wash delicates with other similar items rather than harder-wearing garments like denim, or things with zips.
  • Use a fabric conditioner. This will coat the wool fibres and reduce static and friction.
  • Air dry, don’t tumble dry. Heat and friction will damage the fibres and cause pilling.
  • Never use bleach on wool items as this weakens the fibres and can make them more likely to break and pill.

prevent pilling wool

If your beloved wool sweater or woollen blanket does have some bobbling and needs perking up, here are some tips on getting rid of pilling:

  • Use a fabric comb or electric fabric shaver to carefully remove the bobbles.
  • Using a sharp standard razor, hold the garment taut and gently shave off the pills. Collect the cut-offs with a lint roller or adhesive tape.
  • For mild pilling adhesive tape, a head lice comb or a velcro hair roller are effective (and cheap) ways to remove pills.
  • If you’re travelling and need a quick bobble fix, use the rough part of a velcro fastening to remove bobbles from an item.

pilling wool sweater

For more tips on how to care for wool clothes and throws, and on how to treat stains go here and here.

 

 

Share:

Tips on Taking Care of Cashmere

March 30, 2018 Tags: , , , , , , , , No Comments

Both durable and practical cashmere is one of the most luxurious cold weather materials. In order to keep it in excelent condition and enjoy its durability cashmere needs to be taken care of properly. We piled together a bunch of useful tips that will come in handy when properly cleaning and storing your cashmere garments.

Cashmere care - WoolMe

Share:

Why Wool is Good for You

February 1, 2018 Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , No Comments

Wool is definitely one of the most popular natural materials known but not many of us know the actual benefits of using wool products daily. If you have not known a lot about wool get ready for some knowledge – we are about to introduce you to wool, the durable natural material.

Wool

Share:

How to Prevent Pilling, Shrinking and Moth Damage in Your Woollens

October 13, 2017 Tags: , , , , , , 1 Comment

We all love our woollens, from sweaters to socks, blankets to beanies. So what do we do when they start to look worn, or get damaged? Here are some tips on how to avoid pilling, shrinking and moths eating your beloved wool textiles. It’s important to note that high quality, natural woollens will last longer and look better than cheaper acrylics or synthetic fibres, due to the inherent durability and longer fibres in pure wool. So first things first: invest in decent woollens in the beginning and you’ll get far more use for your money. But if things go wrong, here’s how to solve some of the major problems with wool.

Woollens - WoolMe

Your wool throw has gone rough and stiff

Imagine this: you bought a beautiful new throw in softest wool and have used it as many times as you can without washing. When you realise it needs a refresh you put it in the washing machine on a low temperature and hope for the best. But it comes out feeling rough or stiff, all the snuggliness has gone. What happened? Well, maybe you shouldn’t have washed it in the machine. Unless otherwise marked on your garment’s care instructions it’s best to wash woollens by hand, in cool water. The other cause could be your detergent. Normal laundry liquids are too harsh for wool, so make sure you use a specially-formulated  detergent, like The Laundress Wool and Cashmere, or Ecover Delicate. These contain natural enzymes and no chemicals, and are as good for the planet as they are for your woollies. Make sure you choose a detergent that carries the Woolmark logo, so you know it’s suitable.

If you have already got a less-than soft woolly, try hand washing in cool water with a wool detergent and using a wool fabric softener. Rinse thoroughly and dry outside, away from the sun, and flat. This should revive the fibres and increase the softness, though it may never be quite the same. The key here is prevention.

wool-blanket-throw - WoolMe

Your woollen sweater has pilling

Pilling (those annoying little bobbles that appear on woollen items) is caused by the friction of two surfaces rubbing together. It often occurs in areas like armpits or the sides of a sweater where a bag might hang against it. If you see pilling on a woollen garment you can use a lint roller or special pill shaver to remove them. Longer pills can even be carefully snipped off with scissors or a razor. Avoid a recurrence by washing the item inside out and only use a liquid detergent that is specifically for wool. Dry the item naturally. Natural, top grade pure wool will pill less as the fibres are longer and therefore are not as easily forced to the surface when rubbed.

Your woolly socks have shrunk

Oh the horror of removing your much-loved cosy alpaca wool socks from the machine, only to discover they would only just about fit a Barbie doll! Wool doesn’t actually shrink. In fact, wool is a protein, which means when it’s washed too vigorously or in too high temperatures the fibres in the wool stick together, giving the appearance of shrinkage. If the damage has been done you can stretch the garment while still damp, but sadly there is no way to fully reverse this. Make sure it doesn’t happen by following the manufacturer’s care instructions to the letter. Wash only with appropriate detergent, use cool water and the delicate cycle if you are machine washing, and don’t tumble dry.

Moths are eating your woollens

An infestation of moths can be disastrous. They can chomp through woollen clothes and textiles, but also lots of other things too, ruining much-loved belongings. To prevent getting moths in the first place make sure you only store woollens when they are clean. Use zipped bags if you are storing things over the summer months. Make insect-repellant bags filled with dried lavender and cedar wood, then place these in every drawer or hang in your wardrobe. If you have an infestation already, throw out anything that is beyond repair, keeping the rubbish bag tightly sealed and discard immediately. Place the remaining items in sealed plastic bags and put in the freezer to kill any eggs or larvae. Give your wardrobe and drawers a thorough clean out and wash everything else in there. You can get chemical moth repellant products to treat the problem, or call out a pest controller to deal with a really major infestation.

preventing-moths-wool

Share:

Tips on Cleaning Wool Throws and Blankets

August 24, 2016 Tags: , , , , , , , , , , 1 Comment

Everyone might occasionally get the question – how do you clean wool throws and blankets? Do you wash them at all? Since wool is an incredibly resilient fibre not everyone understands that it requires the gentlest handling in water and is often best left alone. Today we present you the greatest tips on cleaning wool throws and blankets.

Cleaning Wool Throws

Share:

The Cosiest Romantic Gifts for February

February 16, 2016 Tags: , , , , , , , No Comments

Valentine’s Day is one of those days when most of us feel extremely stressed out and just want to hide our heads under the sheets. With the most pink-ish, chocolate-ish and heart shaped ballon-ish day already passed we made up a list of unique and sweet things you can buy for your loved one this February.

  • A “Puffle Waffle” cone

Nosteagea - romantic gifts

Bubble tea is a thing most of us are familiar with, but how many of you have heard about bubble waffles?

Share:

Dying Wool Yarn at Home

February 28, 2013 Tags: , , , No Comments

If you knit, you certainly have wool yarn in your knitting basket. And probably they are in different colors. But if fancied for some other special color of your wool yarn, be aware that you can dye it at home by your own hands with acid dyes. When the dying process is followed correctly, acid dyes create a strong bond with the protein fibers of wool that cannot be washed out.

Balls of clorfull yarn

So, get ready and follow these steps:

Share:

Washing a Wool Throw in the Washing Machine

February 14, 2013 Tags: , , , , , , , No Comments

Wool throws and blankets possess lots of attractive qualities, e.g. fire, water and wrinkle resistance, exceptional insulation and softness. Caring for a wool throw is quite an easy task and we always recommend follow to the instructions the product label dictates. Usually manufacturers insist on dry-cleaning wool products or recommends washing by hand, yet, often wool throws are fine to wash in the washing machine (provided they fit in it, in the first place!).

Wool blankets

To wash a wool blanket in a washing machine, follow these steps:

Share:

Smoothing Wrinkles in Wool Throws and Garments

February 2, 2013 Tags: , , , , , , , , , No Comments

Wool throws, blankets and garments often come with a detailed care instructions on the label. Usually they can only be dry cleaned and some other restrictions may apply. It might seem they are a real pain to maintain. But this is not so. Most of wool throws and garments can be washed at home by hand (although this is not indicated on the label) and they are also a breeze to steam smooth. If your wool throws, sweaters or jackets or any other wool item got wrinkled, just smooth them out this easy way.

wool-throw

The use of the right hanger is important here! Hang your wrinkled garment on smooth wide wooden hanger or wide, rounded plastic one. Stay away of wire hangers and smaller plastic hangers as they may cause your garments to stretch out at the shoulders.

Share:

How to Care for Wool Throws (4)

August 16, 2012 Tags: , , , , , No Comments

Let‘s continue our series of articles of how to care for wool throws and blankets.

How to prevent lint on wool throws and blankets

It’s in the nature of wool throws (and all wool items for that matter) to attract lint. The lint on dark colored wool throws & blankets (black, brown, grey) will show up much more. The tendency of wool products to attract lint is natural and there isn’t a lot one can do to avoid that natural habit, but fortunately there are some actions you can take to lessen its effect on your wool throw.

wool-throws

The first advice is to make the proper decision when purchasing your wool throw (when this is possible). As dark colored wool blanket will generally show up more lint so (and if this is what bother you in the first place) opt for lighter when you are picking out your wool throw or blanket.

Share: